In restrospect; thoughts on blogs and blogging


Lately, I've been thinking of upping and deleting this blog or maybe leaving it to spiral into the darkness of the world wide web abyss. I've realized also that I sound like a broken record, with posts usually going in this sequence - apologies for not blogging, I'm fat and lazy, let's buy clothes that fit and I'm tired of shopping.

Blogging feels empty a lot of times, even more frivolous than web surfing. I started to blog mostly because I felt passionately about buying ethical, well-made clothing and I loathed the fact that my indulgence was contributing in some tangential way to climate change, human rights abuses and all the things wrong in the world; things that have played out in frightening reality over the last few months and that have been discussed eloquently in quite a few blogs. I sometimes want to hit people over the head for their ignorance on current affairs and for continuing irresponsible habits. But the truth is that people have different priorities, income and tastes. We all agree that ethically-made clothing is expensive and terribly difficult to obtain and not everyone has the time or money or willpower to seek out these things. In fact, like eating organic food or buying artisanal cheeses or single-origin coffee, ethical-clothing is a luxury that a lot of us want but can't justify.

I've grown rather apathetic and exhausted just looking at blogs and magazines that seem to continually push a certain alternate reality - one where it seems that you can make printed art and pressed flowers all day and still afford vintage Boro rugs, Eames chairs and a closet full of APC. I mean, most days I get up, work until I look like a disaster at 3pm and continuing plowing on with a jug of coffee in my belly, and I mean literally a 33.8oz Stelton jug full of intensely over-caffeinated coffee (I also have a  theory that's how the Zombie Apocalypse will start). I run errands, do chores, feed one hungry dog and one overworked husband, and by the end of the day, when all the good lighting that bloggers go on and on about is gone, I just want to sleep, play Candy Crush or watch a movie - sometimes all three at once. Despite all that, I make pocket change and leech off of my husband. Life is already exhausting and unfulfilling, I really don't need looking at blogs and magazines to make me feel worse about myself.

Sure, I still want to buy nice clothes because my self-confidence is inextricably and embarrassingly linked to how good I look. But growing older has made me realized that some days, I'm too tired to care. There's so many more things to think about or to spend my money on e.g. traveling, buying a house, building a chicken coop, donating to spineless Democrats, etc., etc. Most days, I just want to feel warm, be comfortable and not have to worry about scuffing my shoes or setting my bag down in mud. I want to be able to go from field work to lunch to a walk with my dog to cleaning the yard without having to change or to use protective leather spray. Do you really think a pair of clippity-clop Dicker boots and hernia-inducing skinny jeans is going to help me achieve that seamlessly? I've taken to looking like a mountain-climbing lumberjack, wearing an endless rotation of the same 5 pieces that don't make me feel bloated. In fact, I wear these 5 pieces so often, I'm thinking of stocking up on multiples of them. The rest of the clothes that I have apparently so carefully "curated", lie unfolded and unironed in a giant pile in the back of the closet. I've garnered so much expensive, unused crap over the years that I get violently nauseated just looking at it. And that, dear readers, is not something that I want to blog about.

I know what you are all thinking - all I ever do is whine and moan and be utterly immature. Blogs aren't real! Just live vicariously through them! Magazines are aspirational! Nobody wants to read about your whining! We need better gun control laws! (see what I did there)? In all serious-ness though, I know these things. My point is that I sometimes feel as if I am personal failure when it comes to blogging - I don't have a purpose or a goal, sometimes I rant about conscious emption, other times I go on and on about shoes and clothing and wishlists and spending more money. As I've come more and more into figuring out exactly what I am trying achieve in my personal style, blogging has become more mundane and disappointing, bordering on futile. There are so many great blogs out there that post erudite discussions on the sustainability and ethics of fashion more eloquently than I can (Empty Emptor and The Nife in L'Air come to mind), other blogs do a better job of pointing you to the latest deals or the latest trends or the latest five-points to looking French. All of which leads to my blog being simultaneously unimportant and banal - the only thing that seems to keep it going is my perpetual rage and existentialism and a polite audience of loyal readers.

I spend most of my time these days dreaming about houses, cooking a lot (as evidenced by my Instagram) and working my arse off to get the hell out of grad school. I don't know if that's part of growing older or if that's just the siren bells of giving up and resigning to a suburban life, but the ennui stemming from style blogging is one that's been simmering for a while. I think that as I start realizing the tremendous responsibilities that adulthood brings, clothing and all the preposterously self-indulgent things in life seem so trivial. And maybe it's the sense of maturity and the process of maturing is what will finally lead one towards actual responsible consumerism.

42 comments :

  1. I like to check in with blog friends, but I no longer seek out new blogs. Most of the time I'm stressed, overworked, and sick. Not to mention unemployed. Stay in grad school as long as you can, go on the market now but line up work in the meanwhile. I rushed out, and my degree is growing stale. Welcome to adjunct hell!

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    1. I hope things are going okay for you Erica, the job market is really tough these days - even in the sciences, I can only imagine what it must be like with a liberal arts degree. Your comment made me very sad, because it hardly seems fair that we spend 7 or 8 years of our lives working on something we feel passionately about only for the world to tell us that we're not good enough for a even a steady, full-time job.

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    2. I would be very sad if you stopped blogging, I always enjoy hearing your thoughts. Also, it comes as no surprise that I tend to read blogs by fellow academics who are trying to figure out how to live a good life.

      Things were different even a few years ago. Timing is everything, and unfortunately there's a backlog of applicants. Many TT jobs are going to people who already have a TT job at a less desirable place. It is hard to maintain any passion in the face of long-term underemployment. I still look at blogs, but most of the time I am focused on keeping the fear at bay. I hope things are more promising for you in the sciences, but having seen the writing on the wall, I guess there's no such thing as a sure thing in academia these days.

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  2. girl, i wish we could get together irl and have a bitch-about-life session together.

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    1. Yes! If you're in Portland anytime let me know, I'm sure I can rifle up some time to hit Happy Hour at Clyde Common.

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    2. Yes! I think we're still planning a NW trip in July or Aug. We're crossing our fingers that the fares will go down a little. I'll let you know once we have our tickets!

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    3. Come in July and we can all have a bitch-about-life session together

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    4. Yesssssss Jennifer, come in July!!!

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    5. Ah, I'm in Portland. And yes, a grad degree ain't what it used to be.

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  3. I feel kind of similar right now. I'm worn out by much of the blog/Tumblr content that I've willingly incorporated into my RSS reader. Who are these people with six Eames chairs in their beautiful post-modernist apartments? They're not a goddamn post-doctoral researcher like I am, apparently. Towards the end of my PhD I naively thought that I might buy myself a couple of Eames chairs once I take up my post-doc job and finally start getting a reasonable income again. I'm starting to realise with the bills as they are, it will probably take me like 10 months to save up for even just two freaking Eames chairs. I would rather put that money towards travel. I wish all these aspirational photos came with price breakdowns and information about the occupations of the people who own all of that stuff, because that stuff is either not practical or not financially attainable for the vast majority of people. I'm pretty sick of these aspirational photos and I'm starting to feel more content with the fact that my home is perfectly fine without the plush Gotland sheepskin rugs that at some point I felt I should have.

    And I'm having some serious blogging ennui at the moment because it just seems like so much navel-gazing. I mean, I'll probably be back and blogging again next week, but at the moment I just can't bring myself to read a consumer psychology paper when I could be, you know, reading a paper that would actually help me conduct my research better and get better results and try to make a difference to how we understand the brain and treat brain diseases and disorders. So, writing about why I felt like buying a baseball cap vs. working towards a better understanding of the neural basis of key cognitive functions that are impaired in a wide range of disorders? Hmm, which to choose.

    Anyway, if you do decide to stop blogging you will be missed, because it's nice just to have another level-headed, thoughtful, well-grounded person out there in the blogosphere (sorry, that's a horrible word) even if you only write infrequently.

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    1. I remember the first time I set foot in Design Within Reach (or as I call it, "Design Out of Reach"). It's the store where they sell Eames, mid-century, and modern Italian furniture like hotcakes. I had recently completed college with my music undergrad, and barely could pay the rent on my $325 a month postage-stamp-sized apartment. While I loved the design, it was like "You want me to pay what now for that lamp?!!?" Ten years later, grad school debt + a decade of uncertain employment, and it still seems as aspirational/unrealistic as ever. So, yes, you should totally throw a few of those photos into Photoshop and superimpose some price tags on things. That's a great idea for a blog post.

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    2. We have a lot of graduate student unemployement in France too. Basically, we are the children of a generation who thought social ascension was possible with education - which was true 30 years ago but there are just too many students going to grad schools nowadays, and there are not so many corresponding jobs... I tend to forget that you guys also have the debt from student loans! In France, only private schools are expensive. I hear you on rent too, once I have paid the Parisian rent for my 25m2 mini-palace, 3 figure-chairs are everything but a priority (I personally find silly to spend so much on furniture, unless you live comfortably). What I'm wondering is: why do these people blog about their expenive furniture? Is it to brag? Prove their worth through the price tag of their possessions? If this is so, it's a bit sad, no?

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  4. I thought this was entertaining, funny, and true. Even if you only drop in occasionally, those are the qualities I'm looking for in a blog -- like you, I'm a little tired of lives that consist of nothing but Eames chairs and APC-filled closets. Most of us have lives to lead (I'm currently feeling your pain) and how we figure out style in the process is much more interesting to me than someone who spends their lives pickling beets in perfect lighting.

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  5. I feel the same which is why I have not updated my blog in over a month.

    At the moment my life is about going to work every day, cooking a nice meal for my BF and I when I get home and over the weekend a combination of seeing family and friends and working on our house. I feel guilty about blogging let alone obsessing about my wardrobe because there is so much more to REAL LIFE.

    I also feel like there are so many people out there that are more devoted to 'curating their wardrobe' (jeez I hate that term) and culling than I am... and I'm not one for half arsed attempts which makes me think I need to stop now.

    Like you, I enjoy instagram because it's real time and only takes a split second to update for those who care. Win win :)

    For all it's worth, I really enjoy your blog and your instagram feed because it feels real. Also losing insterest in this blogger (false) alternative reality.

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  6. I never comment on things, but I'm piping up to say, Yes to everything you said! Bravo, truly.

    Maybe I'll take it further than you did in saying that I'm sick of the aesthetic of "curation" (and "minimalism," etc.). Not because I don't agree with its ethics - I absolutely do - but because it can engender the same kind of obsession with consumption that anything else can. It's just another category for consumption; it doesn't transcend it at all. It feeds back into the narcissistic documentation of our consumer lives that only enlargens that sphere until it's absolutely everything and everywhere ...

    And my personal feeling is, as I get older, that's what I want to be less involved in: consumption, period. I want to produce things, create things.

    My opinion might be in the minority, but when I see a blogger I really like make a post like this, my urge is not to encourage them to stay because I like reading them, but the opposite. Because I like reading you, I urge you to go and unburden yourself. I'm happy thinking there's someone out there living a good and not necessarily always-documented life. If its everyday style and aesthetic pleasures are inaccessible to me, well, that's maybe the way it should be.

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  7. You're wonderful for writing this. Should you choose to go you will be missed! However, I think many of us who read your blog feel much the same....dying to get off the conspicuous consumption merry-go-round and just get on with life as such. We live in such an era of want! Culling the greed within is harder than any closet clean-out.

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  8. I'm going to preach to the choir when I say that I appreciate what you've written (should you leave, I understand but will also miss your refreshing take on things!).

    I remember I started blogging a few years ago because I had a newfound interest in fashion (via Teen Vogue forums, lol) but didn't have anyone to share my excitement with. When I first started a lot of it was about consumption now that I think about it (but I was also 15...), but it was also a way to develop virtual friendships that filled a void I felt in *real* life. Fast forward to freshman year of college and I had gone through the same thing. I became tired of my constant need to accumulate, and in one fell swoop gutted out about half my closet. It was in that search to redefine my own style that I began blogging again (and came across wonderful bloggers like yourself).

    But now, it just feels too contrived. I'm not sure if it has to do with disillusionment, for many of the same reasons you've mentioned, or boredom plain and simple, but I too find myself half a finger twitch away from clicking the delete button for the umpteenth time and doing away with the whole deal. But I think it's also a question of "What do I add to the discussion? Am I a part of the problem? Why would anyone care what I write?" It seems as if this whole minimalism-but-really-just-self-important-consumerism thing has turned into a bit of a circle jerk and there are now very few people who come off as truly honest and thoughtful. It seems for you (like myself) blogging has just outlived its purpose. Maybe one day you'll come back to it, but if not that's cool too.

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  9. I will miss your voice if you stop blogging. There are very few blogs which I read or comment on regularly. That said, I do enjoy the blogs I still follow, either for their visual appeal or for their thought-provoking write-ups. Consumption is, for the most part, a self-indulgent business, but I don't think there's anything wrong with that, provided one keeps it in context, and if it brings one pleasure, then well, why not?
    I also think people need to hear more about ethical alternatives, given the impact of their decisions (Rana Plaza, which supplied to Benetton and Mango collapsing and leaving more than 1100 people dead in Bangladesh).

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  10. I just had to do a Google image search for "Eames chair", I'm completely clueless. I had a complete clean-out of the blogs that I follow sometime last year, and for me it helped a lot. I much prefer to follow real people with real lives, real incomes and without professional photographer boyfriends. If you do decide to quit blogging I hope you'll stay on Instagram, because I really enjoy your snapshots!

    Unlike others here I'm not bored with blogging, but then again, mine is not purely a "style" blog. I'm trying to be true to myself in this clusterfudge of APC and Isabel Marant, and if I want to blog a doodle of a cat then I will blog a doodle of a cat. I just want a creative outlet, even though it HAS turned into "Maja and her merry band of lipsticks" lately.

    Also, I love a good claws-out rant post. High five and snarl on, sister!

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    1. I am way late on this discussion but YES- I tend to skip over the "professional" blogs in my reader and go straight to the blogs that feature real lives, lived on real incomes. The photography or design may not be perfect, but I can read a magazine for that.

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  11. Wondering about the purpose of your own blog is something most bloggers go through I imagine. I also had a "blogging crisis" of sorts myself, when I realized I was considered a "fashion blog" whereas my intent was more to share my ideas about consumerism, self esteem etc.

    If I understand well, there are 2 issues you mention in your post:
    - where your own blog is headed
    - being fed up with the glossy lies of the media you follow as a reader

    I don't believe owning a blog equals you become one of these glossy lies for your readers. I also don't believe your blog won't be interesting if you are not showing glossy lies. You make whatever you'd like of your blog. This is the beauty of this platform. I think the question you could ask yourself right now is: why did I create this blog? What is my purpose as a blog writer? What do I want to share with my readers? What value can I bring to them?

    If you ask yourself these questions, why you blog, what doesn't satisfy you in your blog right now and what you can share instead, I'm sure you can find great things to blog about.

    And in the end, the readers who choose to follow you will like what you post, otherwise they wouldn't be around anymore. You seem to be asking yourself a lot of questions lately, maybe some of us are too, so maybe it's interesting to blog about them.

    As to the second point, being fed up with idyllic images and perfect lives, then you can choose as a reader to curate your rss feed and choose to follow media that you find to be meaningful and bring you value instead of showing you dreams that make you feel bad about your life.

    Sorry this ended up being a very long comment, I hope it helps!

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  12. I like your blog *because* of posts like this. I, too, got a "real job" and went on a year-long mission to "be stylish" by curating, assessing, blah blah blah. What do I now wear? A nicer version of my favorite old outfits, with pants that fit instead of sag, and pieces that are of better/ethical construction but otherwise look the same.

    Nothing wrong with that. And having blogs like yours to read keep me from falling off the wagon and turning into Insane Cosmo Girl with Credit Card overnight. Hyperbole, but that's how it feels. When I read blogs like yours, including yours, I know that other people out there pick up the metaphorical cookie, look at it, and put it down. Solidarity.

    I'm fed up with blogs that show hauls and are always picturing new, new, new. I like blogs (again, like yours!) that focus more on enjoying the items you have, however long you've had them.

    This fall, I'll be starting an M.S. I hope your blog will remain around for continuing inspiration.

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    1. Oops, sorry, that was BoSanBo from Twitter/Instagram/stalking this section of the blogosphere.

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  13. in dissertation writing depths myself and as an occasional lurker on your blog, really appreciate that you took the time to write out these thoughts. I appreciate and totally agree with your rant about the prettified blog life that doesn't seem to acknowledge everyday realities, and I too have gone through the process of coming to value experience over obsessing with appearances. Grad school afforded a lot of time for navel gazing, preoccupation with self presentation, and now that I have come to grips with emerging into the working world, whether academia or elsewhere, I too think there are things that are more important as my time becomes more valuable. I will be sorry if you stop blogging but I understand why you might want to refuse to be part of the world of escapism.

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  14. agreeing with so many of the eloquent commenters above. as Ammu and others have already said, i will very much miss your online voice if you stop blogging!

    i don't necessarily think everything needs to be so either or; so mutually exclusive. surely one can plan for Big Life Goals and still have a creative/personal space online; surely taking pleasure in beautiful things doesn't automatically detract from living intelligently and critically in the world.

    as for the blog, i'm seconding Kali's comment on this. it's also really about where your heart is. if it's no longer fun and enjoyable, then why do it?

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  15. I'm so glad you wrote this post - I can really identify with so many of the things you're talking about, and it's a relief to hear someone say it. All of my money and time go in to my job and paying for my house and to feed myself! I don't seem to have much energy left for fashion, and even when I do, I have no surplus finances to devote to any 'meaningful' additions to my wardrobe (ie. not dull essentials like new underwear). Just thinking about it feels futile and depressing.

    Some days my attitude is 'oh sod it, I couldn't care less about clothes; the fashion industry makes me feel anxious and insignificant and thinking about it makes me unhappy', and other days I'm getting excited about a new issue of The Gentlewoman or a new collection from Uniqlo... I think it's important to acknowledge this complex, often schizophrenic, relationship that many people have with clothing and fashion. And, to a certain extent, shatter this alternate reality in which nobody works (or talks about working) and yet money and closets full of luxury clothing magically materialize from the ether.

    Anyway, I hope you get your chicken coop. That's something I'm working towards too - my partner's sister has chickens and quails and the fresh eggs every day are just amazing! My parents used to have a particularly friendly chicken which liked to sit on my mum's lap, so cute :)

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  16. i wished i've read this post before i wrote my own paltry mess of a blog post. its uncanny in how similar it is in tone, except mine is more tied to the recent specific chain of events. my quandary is specific in that its not existential, but rather about the fundamentals of the fashion industry. the blog has been a convenient distraction, but it has not been able to fully mask the deleterious affects of the industry and how truly poisonous it is in terms of human and environmental costs. im falling out of love for fashion badly. i have yet to find ways to come to terms with this myself, so i have no advice to offer. recognize however, that you are not alone! :D

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  17. I think I've featured most of you on my Pass It Forward series. I started it to give blogs like yours a platform because I was thoroughly sick of the blatant consumerism and "cool" crowd. Not to say that I don't enjoy it every now and then.

    I had an epiphany earlier in the year and thought screw this, I don't want to sugarcoat anything but neither do I want to be tactless either. Hence, tons of posts that had more to do with "keeping it real". Literally. It was interesting going to Fashion Week. I met some genuinely down to earth people. Yes, they work in the fashion industry but they were able to separate that from their life in order not to get burn out. We talked about life, our future, kids, jobs and nothing (absolutely nothing) about fashion.

    I received an encouraging email from a lovely reader the other day. She said that perhaps tides will change soon where more and more people are sick of consumer driven nature of blogs and seek ones that have more "substance".

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  18. Well, I like your blog because it's NOT like a magazine, and it doesn't promote this idea that we can just run around taking photos in downtown Manhattan and magically live a life of ease and luxury. That's why I visit your blog, Kali's, Lin's, Empty Emptor, the list goes on. Here are real people with real thoughts, and an interesting voice, and yes, they have day jobs/responsibilities, and no, spending money on clothing is not always the top priority. So thank you for sharing your voice; I understand if blogging is not a high priority anymore, but rest assured that your readers visit because of what you do share and your insights and opinions. I prefer reality over some fashion fantasy life that so many people project on their blogs.

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  19. thought-provoking as always, amanda. i ask myself similar questions regarding my own relationship to consumerism. and i think it really is a learning and growing process. i aspire to be more like my aunt, who after leaving advertising to become a therapist, now saves money and wears her well made clothes until they come apart at the seams! i do believe we will all arrive at the obvious conclusion that clothes and material possessions simply do not make us, but it will take its own course. i hope that you aren't too hard on yourself, and that you don't lose sight of your aim to do better. being a consumer and a thinker are not mutually exclusive.

    and i thank you for not always parading around like everything is roses; it's a breath of fresh air. if you stop blogging, i will miss your voice--but, i'll still follow you on instagram and still meet you in Chicago or wherever it is we cross paths!

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  20. Please don't. Post-grad can take a lot of you but it will pass. And you have no idea how grateful I am to find your blog amidst all the nonsense out there.

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  21. I will miss your voice. But if it's no longer enjoyable, then why do it? I started blogging and, despite being so uninspired to blog lately, continue to do so because human rights and refugees was just too much to think about all the time. I needed frivolity and the space to be distracted by pretty dresses. It was also safer to be distracted when I lived in Cambodia, because you could not get anything there and the cheap garment factory clothes, smuggled out of those factories where women workers constantly had fainting spells, was just not an option for me. Now that I am back in the US, I am bombarded by consume-consume-consume. It will be a challenge keeping my consumer habits in check.

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  22. You will be missed if you decide not to continue - I love your little blog for it's little snippets into your life and what you have shared so far. Sometimes, blogging does feel a little pointless and for very little gain - after a year of blogging, I'm coming out on the other side and the initial thrill has gone and now there are more days where I want to do other things rather than think what I can feature in a post. Just recently, I've spent the evenings on the kindle just playing mahjong - thoroughly time consuming and pointless but just what I need to do to unwind. Life isn't a bed of roses and I love people who honestly portray this. I don't think "oh woe is them" - but more "I'm not alone".

    And I agree with Sarge in Charge about skipping the more professional and glossy blogs - a lot of them have nothing to say and I also tend to skip them for more of a dose of the real stuff. Yes, I have a somewhat fun and frivoulous blog but I hope to provide a little bit of fun reading for someone rather than a straight I just bought this and isn't it nice? I'm a mum - life isn't a bed of roses even though my children are pretty good on the whole. But the blog lets me express a part of myself which my family don't get.

    Whichever way you go ... I will miss your voice.

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  23. It's posts like these - ironically you're writing about not wanting to blog any more - that keeps me coming back to your blog. Obviously I don't find your posts bland.

    I think the blogging culture encourages perfection and it seems to me that often it is the blogs that have a certain coherence (usually visually or aesthetics-wise) that attract a bigger audience. And then there are the blogs do an incredible job of expanding and exploring a certain topic. I am to some extent envious of these blogs because my blog is all over the place, vacillating between personal to "issues" to the odd outfit post. But even until now I can't articulate a clear reason for blogging in the first - 5 years ago, I was just "trying it out" and it stuck - so I'm not too bothered that my blog is basically a stream of thoughts with the occasional eureka moment.

    Perhaps you have a stronger streak of perfectionism, which is why bothers you that your blog doesn't a "goal". But while I enjoy the odd blog that offers beautifully composed and lit pictures of a perfect life (or "curated" pictures of a perfect life they culled from other Tumblrs), mostly I feel unsatisfied by this "Martha Stewart" take on life. I'm not looking to pry into the lurid details of a person's life but then I think the best blogs are the ones that share enough of the complexity that is part of life with the good things we want to celebrate. And of course scratch off some of the wool retailers and brands are trying to pull over our eyes, thanks to honest reviews.

    Anyway, sounds like you're in a tough spot now where grad school and income is concerned; I have no words of comfort ...I am gainfully employed but sometimes I wish I learned a trade instead of getting a degree. According to World War Z (which is an incredible read) I will be worth less than nothing should we need to rebuild a world from scratch after the Zombie Apocalypse. Perhaps it's a good thing you're already honing those chicken coop skills...

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  24. Please don't delete....I love your posts, especially because you do not try to make it life seem perfect.

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  26. This is my first visit to your blog---I learned of your through Pugly Pixel. Just wanted to say that I really enjoyed your candor, and can relate in many regards. Good luck wherever your path leads!

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  27. I really enjoyed reading this...so many thoughts are going through my mind at the moment...you really stimulated my brain ( in a good way ) x

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  28. Please don't stop blogging. I'm so fed up with people with their 'display home' lives and lifestyles ... so perfect and boring, that reading this has made me 'love' you. I'm so grateful for your honesty. Your blog has actually taught me a lot about buying clothes with the long term in mind, being mindful of where and what I buy and, of course, great style! Maybe I need to comment more and be more interactive and show my real appreciation for what you bring to the web.
    X Alison

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  29. Amanda,
    Yes, please don't stop blogging! I read this post and it gave me chills. I was nodding along agreeing with every word you said.

    Strangely, although I own a retail store, I find myself hating the idea of buying more things a lot these days. Especially if I don't know who actually made it, what it's made of, were animals harmed in the process?, is this "fast design" and an idea stolen from a starving designer somewhere?, it never ends.

    Thanks to Netflix and their endless food documentaries that make me feel like a terrible person for eating eggs, drinking milk and pining for a new pair of leather boots, it has really made me evaluate my business and I'm constantly fighting with myself on whether it's ethical to carry certain products. So I just don't.

    And even though I don't market my business and explain the amount of time I go through making sure the products I carry have not harmed people or animals, I probably will never be a retailer than will carry leather goods, furs or skins. And if wool, I have to know where the wool is from. It's madness.

    Anyway, thank you Amanda, for keeping it real!

    -Michele

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  30. This post is so useful and easy to read! I dropped off the face of the blogosphere for a while, for reasons similar to yours (in a different post). But, because each person is different, we might all have new and important contributions, however nuanced they might be.

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